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Hot Topic (More than 10 Replies) Love Bird Lovers (Read 19,931 times)
TomDuffy
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Love Bird Lovers
Jun 8th, 2005 at 11:13pm
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I recently got a lovebird I named him Harry. He was a challenge the first dew weeks. A day or so ago I was wearing a warm up jacket and sitting on the coach with Harry and he began focusing a lot of attention on the collar of my jacket. All of a sudden he climbed down into the collar and sat there just under my chin.

Since that event I started wearing a scarf around my neck and he loves to nuzzle under the cloth. I tell you this changed the personality of this bird over night. Now he is so so cuddly and he allows me to touch his head and wings.

I want to connect with other Love Bird people. Feel free to post a message.

We Love Bird Lovers need to help each other out. My wife and I are so so happy to have Harry.

TOM
  
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KiWi-My-LoVeBiRd
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Re: Love Bird Lovers
Reply #1 - Aug 30th, 2005 at 12:54pm
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Hey! Well I have a lovebird called Kiwi and I got him in June and he is still scared of me. Hoe do I tame him well enough so that he cuddles with me?
  
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TomDuffy
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Re: Love Bird Lovers
Reply #2 - Dec 18th, 2005 at 1:19am
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I hate to report that I had an accident with my Harry last summer. It was an awful event. But it is all over and I am fine.

I got a new baby lovebird three months old. His name is BB.

He is a gem of a bird. A bit nippie but that will pass as he grows up. Does anyoen out there have a nipping solaution with Lovebirds.

I beleive that they are nipping when they want food and water. but sometimes it is about play.
  
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lola_lovebird
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Re: Love Bird Lovers
Reply #3 - Apr 9th, 2007 at 5:40am
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I got a cutie little love bird just last january. And I am new on these boards. I am so in love with my little lola.  She is a little nippie as you have mentioned and do not know what to do but other than that she is my perfect little angle and pet and companion. 

I have a HUGE major problem and concern and I need all of you to try and find out if you have any information on this.  I had lung surgery 4 weeks ago.  I have  HYPERSENSITIVITY PNEUMONITIS.  To get to the point, I have it so bad that I am on oxygen continuously. And the DR at the Cleveland Cl beleives it may be the bird that is causing it, although , it maybe any number of other causes, that may be hard to prove.

I am DEVASTATED!!!!  So if any of you can give me words of wisdom or encouragement I would really appreciate it.....

I AM SIGNING OFF AS A GREAT LOVER OF BIRD, AND ITS THE ONLY PET I CAN HAVE  ANYMORE, THIS IS THE END OF THE LINE, I AM ALLERGIC TO CATS, AND A DOG WOULD BE IMPOSSIBLE FOR ME TO TAKE CARE OF WITH MY HEALTH DECLINING.. WHICH MEANS MY LOLA IS ALL I HAVE AND ALL I WANT, AND I AM DESPERATELY TRYING TO KEEP HER.      PLEASE REPLY
  
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Tiffer1981
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Re: Love Bird Lovers
Reply #4 - Apr 9th, 2007 at 9:47am
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Lovebirds are sort of like eternal 3 year olds.  You can't let them get away with nipping, even if it's just playful...if you do, they'll take it as a sign that it's OK.  You sort of have to discipline them like a 3 year old too.  

If your bird is pretty new and is biting, it's probably partly out of the bird not being totally comfortable with  you yet.  If you've had the bird for a while, it's likely going through a phase (which they do).   A few tricks to stopping biting: distract the bird (toys, treats, games), scold the bird verbally (no in a soft, but firm voice (DON'T YELL....birds are very tempermental and skittish, never yell)), also, try putting the bird back in it's cage for a few minutes...sort of like a time out.  Always treat the bird for good behavior (even if that's just sitting there w/o biting you).  Also, be sure the bird is actually biting and not kissing (taking you gently w/it's beak and flicking you w/its tongue) or using his beak to balance.

A few more general tips: keep the bird's wings clipped...not being able to fly makes the bird rely on you, which helps the two of you bond (and prevents a possible "escape"), don't ever yell or physically punish (tapping beak, etc.), love birds love to snuggle in warm dark places; so to help the two of you bond, try covering w/a blanket and letting the bird crawl under (don't force), experiment w/lots of people foods (birds love people foods) just be sure to research which foods you shouldn't give (avocado, caffeine, chocolate, rhubarb, milk (does not necessarily include all milk products)).
  
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Bibi
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Re: Love Bird Lovers
Reply #5 - Apr 9th, 2007 at 10:45am
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I am sorry but I disagree 100% on the clipping advice.   Not allowing a pet bird to fly is one of the cruelest things people can do to them. 
First of all, it is not true that birds need to feel insecure and dependent to bond with a human.   True bonding is not done out of sheer desperation, it's born out of trust and love.  Patience, love and persistence work just the same in taming them and establish the kind of relationship any bird lover should have with his bird.   It takes longer but it's kinder and the only way to achieve a good result.
Secondly it's terribly unhealthy.  Birds need to fly to keep their respiratory system in good working order.  Birds do not have a diaphragm like we do, that would allows them to breathe in and out at will, they have lungs and air sacs that are moved by muscles.  These muscles are the same muscles that move the wings (and they are also the same muscles used for laying eggs).  If the wings don't move (translate into flying) the lungs and air-sacs are not being used to their full potential.  Any organ that it's not used properly will atrophy.  An atrophied organ is an organ prone to infections.  Respiratory infections are one of the primary causes of early death in pet birds. 
Last but not least there is the emotional damage. Imagine yourself being hobbled (something they used to do to run-away slaves which consisted of a piece of wood with holes for the ankles so it would allow the slave to walk but not to run).  It's not only the not being able to go where they want to go, it's the not being able to get away from danger.   When birds perceive danger, they take off.  That's the one reaction common to all flying birds.  Even ground dwelling birds that don't have the capacity to fly long distances (like quail, guinea fowl, chickens, etc) would take off at the first sign of danger.   Clipping allows only for gliding or coasting, there is no vertical uplift.  What do you think it does to a little bird which, in nature is prey of larger animals and ergo is constantly aware of what is going on around him, not to be able to get away from danger?  I'll tell you what it does, it breeds insecurity and makes them live in a state of constant stress.  One of the main reasons why birds pluck and lovebirds are known for feather destructive behaviors. 

As to nipping, yes, lovies are nippy.  Most small parrots are.  Big parrots, too, as a matter of fact, some species more than others.  In most cases, it's not even aggression that motivates them.  Parrots use nips to alert their mates of danger, to 'warn' them not to pay attention to other birds, just the same way a wife would elbow her husband in the ribs when a pretty girl walks by only.  These are called 'love bites' but they don't feel to us as any kind of love because when they do it to their mates, they have to go through a double layer of feathers to get to the skin.  In our case, defective 'mates' that we are, we have no feathers to protect us so they hurt.   People that keep birds need to adapt to their needs, not the other way around. 

As to the hypersensitivity pneumonitis,yes, it is also called bird breeder disease, bird breeder lung, pigeon breeder lung, mushroom picker lung, cheese worker disease and a lot of other names but they are all the same.  It's a super-duper allergic reaction to a particular allergen.   Birds produce dander (a white powder -keratin from their feathers) and some people will develop a very strong reaction to it but it usually happens to people who have a lot of birds for a long period of time.  In your case, with only one very small bird, it must have been brought on by something else because, besides, lovebirds are not considered 'dusty' birds like a cockatoo, a gray or even a cockatiel would be.   I don't know how severe your case is or if it will help at all but bathing them on a daily basis and keeping a very good, large capacity air purifier running all the time helps a lot with it.

  
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Tiffer1981
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Re: Love Bird Lovers
Reply #6 - Apr 9th, 2007 at 11:54am
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Guess we'll have to agree to disagree Bibi...I've grown up with birds (cockatoos, love birds, tiels, macaws, coniers, doves (some of which came straight from the breeder)) and I've always found clipping to be a safe, effective measure in bringing up birds.  The one bird my family didn't keep clipped on a regular basis got spooked and flew out the door when someone walked in, never to be seen or heard from again.  Many bird breeders, enthusiasts, and vets agree with my position (as I'm sure many do with yours).

As for nipping, yes it's natural, but if it gets out of hand (and painful) it destroys the bond between bird and human.  Further, if it's allowed, it often escalates to the point the human can no longer handle the bird.
  
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Bibi
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Re: Love Bird Lovers
Reply #7 - Apr 10th, 2007 at 11:07am
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Yes, it's true, all breeders, all petstores and a lot of vets do agree with you.  Most books about birds do too.  But all these people make their living from captive birds so it's a bit like believing a salesman telling you what the product they sell is going to need.   Me, I am very distrustful and would not take their opinion as the gospel without verifying the info on my own.   

I've had birds my entire life, there were birds in my home when I was born and I cannot remember a single time in my life when I've not had birds.  My first bird was a Quaker I hand raised with my grandmother when I was ten and got my first German Hartz Roller of champion bloodlines when I was thirteen.  Plus, I've been  rescuing for fifteen years now (Bea and Birds).  It's a sad truth that people are not aware of the huge overpopulation problem we have with pet birds in USA and of how inadequate the care we give them is.

If you currently have clipped birds, I urge you to do more research about the subject because I also used to think that clipping was fine until I learned more about avian physiology.   The truth is that although we still don't know near enough about birds, we have learned A LOT in the last five or ten years and many of us have had to revise our husbandry accordingly.   You might change your mind.
  
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lola_lovebird
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Re: Love Bird Lovers
Reply #8 - Apr 10th, 2007 at 11:19am
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When you folks read what bb said about clipping wings take it from someone that only knows something about breathing on oxygen and after having lung surgery and that if I don't exercise my lungs right now even though it hurts like heck to make those air sacks open up...
THEY WILL ATTROPHY!!!!!!
And then they won't work and infection will set in and so on and so forth. And I am human. So, how does that make bb wrong about a tiny littly bird or any bird for that matter?
And I am no bird expert. Just a bird lover. And I respect what someone like bb had to say because I truly undersood and related to the fact that what was said was true. I'm one of those kind of people that not just went to Dr's, I researched EVERYTHING I could get my hands on for what I was in for, how do you think I found this site?

  
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Tiffer1981
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Re: Love Bird Lovers
Reply #9 - Apr 12th, 2007 at 9:05am
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I'm not meaning to argue, just point out a couple of things that seem to be missing from our discussion thus far. 

You can clip enough so that the bird can't make an escape w/o totally disabling its flight ability.  Further, even birds w/clipped wings still use their wings a great deal (the flying motion, w/o actually flying).

Further, birds weren't meant to be kept in captivity; so no situation is ideal (either clipping and risking lung problems or not clipping and risking escape or injury).

I just think those are important considerations for this issue.
  
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Bibi
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Re: Love Bird Lovers
Reply #10 - Apr 12th, 2007 at 1:37pm
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Absolutey right!  And I will add that not only birds but any undomesticated species was never meant to be kept in captivity.  But, when it comes to pet psittacines, we just cannot release them into the wild because captive-bred birds do not learn survival skills from their parents and would die on their own. 

But that doesn't mean that we cannot try our very best to give them the best possible environment, a healthy diet and as much freedom as we can.  That's why I advocate feeding them an organic diet as similar as possible to their natural one (not so much in the elements themselves as we obviously cannot get jungle plant material in the supermarket but in the percentages of protein/fiber/carbs); never keeping social species as lone birds (and all psittacines are highly social birds), and housing them in a large bird room with both full spectrum and natural light (for exposure to twilight), controlled temperature/humidity/air quality, tree branches for perches; and, of course, cage-free and fully flighted.  It might not be the ideal but, when it comes to captive-bred parrots, it's the best we can do.   

I firmly believe that one should never keep an animal that one cannot provide with all their needs to live a healthy life (note that I did not say 'happy' because I don't think that a parrot living in a human environment can ever be really happy).  I also believe that the more we diverge from Nature's ways, the worse it will be for the animal.  When it comes to birds, flying is not only what defines them and separates them from other species, it is the only mode of transportation they have and the one and only exercise that keeps them healthy (I don't really think that opening their wings and coasting two feet down to the floor could really qualify as exercise for a bird).   

The argument that really clinches it for me is that, in truth, clipping is never, ever done to benefit the bird, it is always and without exception done to make the human caregiver's life easier, and, when you really come down to it,  it actually harms them.  So clipping is  a big no-no for me because, personally, when it comes to the animals I have under my care, their needs always come first.  My convenience isn't even part of the equation.
  
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lola_lovebird
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Re: Love Bird Lovers
Reply #11 - Apr 12th, 2007 at 2:40pm
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Just thought I'd drop in to say that Little Lola is in her Lovely large cockateil cage with her toys  and her cuddly bed that is grey  that she can go in and out of when she pleases which she loves to go in alot!! And right now she is just chirping away and she wants tell all her feather freinds HELLO!!
  
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Tiffer1981
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Re: Love Bird Lovers
Reply #12 - Apr 12th, 2007 at 7:56pm
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My only real disagreement with you, Bibi, is your statement that clipping is never done for the benefit of the bird.  That's simply not true.  The only benefit for the owner/care giver is for training purposes; so once a bird is trained what other benefit is there?  HOWEVER, captive birds who aren't clipped can EASILY fly out a door (like I already said, we had a beautiful umbrella cockatoo (named Somora) do this...someone walked in at the same time someone else made a noise in the kitchen which spooked the bird.  She flew out the door and we never saw her again (despite a tremendous amount of searching).  Obviously cockatoos aren't native to Arkansas and I only hope that she was able to survive and fend for herself in the wild.   Further, bigger birds (such as a military macaw, for example) can easily injure themselves trying to fly around in a house that simply isn't big enough for their rather large wingspan (ours had a wingspan of 6 feet).

So, while I'm not trying to dissuade you from thinking that clipping isn't good, I do hope you realize that some people who clip actually do it for reasons other than ease of caregiving.
  
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Bibi
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Re: Love Bird Lovers
Reply #13 - Apr 13th, 2007 at 11:32am
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But, Tiffer, isn't keeping a bird in a living room where it can go out the door and get lost exclusivelydone for the owner's convenience?   It certainly does not benefit the bird....  you have to keep it in a cage or the bird destroys your furniture, it's kept at temperature and humidity levels comfortable to people but not to them, the air and light quality are awful, you can't keep them to a strict natural daylight schedule which screws up their metabolisms, and, normally, they don't even have companions of their own species.   You can get away with keeping small birds in a human environment if you are very, very careful but you can't do it with large birds.   They need to be in a birdroom built for bird safety (special steel screens in the windows, double door, large enough for the bird to fly, etc) with other birds of their own species (as nature intended), and where there is no danger of them getting lost or injured.   It's their own world in there, they have their food, their perches, their toys, their friends and mates and, believe it or not, they don't ever try to leave it. 

Besides, it's not true that birds that are clipped don't get lost.  I personally know of two that did (a CAG and a Yellow Nape Amazon which belonged to two different friends of mine) and parrot 911 is full of stories of clipped birds that coasted out the window never to be seen again. 

And, personally, if I am going to lose a parrot, I would much rather lose a flighted bird which can take off when there is danger and have a chance at survival than a clipped one which is going to be a sitting duck for cats, cars, etc.
  
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Tiffer1981
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Re: Love Bird Lovers
Reply #14 - Apr 13th, 2007 at 1:13pm
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Don't put words in my mouth.  I didn't say clipped birds couldn't get lost, but you have to admit, it's a lot less likely. 

As for the perfect bird room environment you were talking about, yeah that's great...awesome, in fact.  Realistically, though, how many people can and do have their bird in that sort of atmosphere?  Very few, I think.  We almost never kept any of our birds caged (except the small ones).  They pretty much had free roam of the house, and right or wrong, that's how a lot of people have their birds as well (especially the bigger ones).  Also, even people who have special rooms/buildings for their birds often bring them out in the family room during the day for socialization...it only takes 1 second, 1 door/window open, to lose a bird forever.

I'm not going to argue with you.  I just wanted to put that information out there so that anyone looking to this thread for advice would have both sides to the issue.  I think we've both said pretty much all we can on this issue.  As such, I won't be posting about this anymore.
  
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